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Determination of time-of-death is closely related to the mortality criteria. In prehistoric times, the criteria of death were narrated through the event of the body being evacuated from the spirit or soul leaving the human body. Along with the development of science in the modern era, scientists argue the criteria of biological death and clinical death. This study projected to critically philosophically analyze the time-of-death determination related to scientific criteria. The methods used in the data analysis stage were historical, hermeneutic, comparative, and critical reflection. The results showed that the scientific criteria of death were inadequate to be used in the determination of time-of-death. Time-of-death objectively existed as a separate reality outside of human beings and its existence was absolutely determined or influenced by the existence of other realities. Time-of-death ontologically meant the end of life; epistemologically signified the absence of life and had no mysterious nature; axiologically it was a symbol or metaphor of human powerlessness to judge and determine the continuity of life.

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