Imperialism, Evangelization, and the Moroccan Landscape

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  •   Latifa Safoui

Abstract

Christian missionary evangelization reached its culminating point during the nineteenth century. Many experts in the field of missionary studies owe this flurry of Christian missions to an equivalent extending reach of imperialism, which, they contend, had largely facilitated the work of the Christian missions, providing them with the necessary logistic and financial support. The present paper puts forward a different view based on the trajectory of the Christian missions in Morocco at the epoch. It argues that the grand aims of imperialism were far from being spiritual. Furthermore, the political situation of Morocco during the colonial era, being a highly disputed colonial territory amongst the then superpowers, Britain and France, generated a conflict of interests that influenced the missions’ strategies of work there. The claim that Christian missionaries served as imperial agents in Morocco, working on promoting the high interests of their colonial countries, is open to question.


Keywords: Christian missions, Imperialism, Morocco, Nineteenth Century.

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How to Cite
Safoui, L. (2022). Imperialism, Evangelization, and the Moroccan Landscape. European Journal of Theology and Philosophy, 2(4), 1–6. https://doi.org/10.24018/theology.2022.2.4.69